The Statute of Limitation for Parents Who Owe Child Support in Texas

The Texas court allows the custodial parent to recover lost child support during a specific period. Here’s everything you need to know about the statute of limitations for Texas child support arrears.

In Texas, noncustodial parents have a legal obligation to make child support payments to the custodial parent. If the noncustodial parent misses or does not make child support payments, the custodial parent may file for back child support. However, the Texas court may not recover lost child support if the statute of limitations passes.

Texas Child Support

In Texas, the Child Support Division office handles all matters relating to child support.

The Texas court requires parents to support their children. For children with parents who are not together, the Texas court requires the noncustodial parent to pay child support to ensure their child receives the same benefits as a child in a two-parent household. Child support is a series of payments from one parent to the other to assist with the care and needs of their child.

In Texas, child support may assist a parent with their child’s:

  • Medical care
  • Education
  • Child care
  • Fees for extracurricular activities
  • Living expenses
  • Basic necessities, such as clothing or food
  • Transportation expenses
  • Any expenses relating to the specific needs of the child

Related: How to Terminate Child Support in Texas

Consequences of Not Paying Child Support in Texas

In some cases, the parent paying child support may not make payments altogether or miss child support payments. The Texas court requires parents to make up for any missed payments.

If a parent continuously does not make child support payments or does not make up for missed payments, they may suffer legal consequences.

Consequences of not paying child support in Texas may include:

  • Being held in civil or criminal contempt of court
  • Jail time
  • Fines
  • License suspension
  • Passport denial
  • Liens
  • Credit bureau reporting
  • Lottery interception

Child Support Arrears Statute of Limitations in Texas

The custodial parent should inform the Texas court if the noncustodial parent misses or avoids child support payments. Due to the statute of limitations.

for child support arrears in Texas, the custodial parent may only file for back child support during a certain period. If the period passes, the court may decide whether or not to award the custodial parent missed child support payments.

If there is an existing court order for child support, parents may file for back child support for up to ten years after the child’s eighteenth birthday or ten years after the child support obligation ends. The court may or may not decide to award parents missed child support payments ten years after their child’s eighteenth birthday or the termination of the child support order.

Related: How to Report a New Job to Child Support in Texas

Due to Texas child support laws, the noncustodial parent has a legal obligation to provide child support, regardless of the presence of a child support court order. If there is no existing court order for child support, the custodial parent may file for the recovery of lost child support for up to four years after their child’s eighteenth birthday. The Texas court may not consider cases for recovery child support after a child is twenty-two if there is no child support order.

FAQs About Statute of Limitations for Texas Child Support Arrears

What is a noncustodial parent?

The noncustodial parent is the parent who does not have majority physical custody of their child. If a child lives with one parent for all or the majority of their time, the parent they live with is known as the custodial parent.

Can I still file for child support arrears if there is no child support order?

In Texas, the court requires parents to pay child support even if there is no court order. However, if a parent does not receive child support payments and does not have a child support court order, they may only file to recover child support before their child turns twenty-two.

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If you or a loved one would like to learn more about Statute of Limitations for Texas Child Support Arrears, get your free consultation with one of our Child Support Attorneys in Texas today!