Reporting New Jobs to Child Support in Texas

Each state has a different process for modifying child support. Here’s how to report a new job to child support in Texas.

To report a new job to child support in Texas, detail your income changes in a Review for Modification. Next, work with the assigned Child Support Review Specialist to create a new child support order that reflects your employment change. A judge will either approve or deny the alterations to the child support order.

What are the child support policies in Texas?

Texas law requires divorced parents who do not have custody over their child, also referred to as noncustodial parents, to provide the child with financial support. A judge references the noncustodial parent’s income to determine the amount of the child support payments. A noncustodial parent may pay more than the required amount but may not pay less than the required amount.

Noncustodial parents should report new jobs to the Office of the Attorney General to help ensure their child support order accommodates the income change.

Related: Does Cheating Affect Child Support in California?

Steps to Report a New Job to Child Support in Texas

1. Submit a Review for Modification

Reporting new jobs to child support is a form of modifying your child support order. Only one request for a review is required and may be submitted through the online form or by mailing a Request for Review form to the Child Support Division.

Make sure to report the income from your new job in the Financial Information section and specify whether your income has increased or decreased. It will take approximately 30 days for a representative from the Child Support Division to contact both parents about the request.

2. Provide all necessary information to the representative

The representative from the Child Support Division may ask both parents to verify their income, health insurance coverage, and home addresses. Preparing documented proof of your income and health insurance coverage may help shorten the time it takes the Child Support Division to assign a Child Support Review Specialist to your case.

3. Wait for your case to be approved

The Child Support Review Specialist compares the original child support order to the information in the modification request. Both parents receive a notification letter with a scheduled negotiation appointment once the specialist approves the request.

You may submit another request if the specialist does not approve the request.

4. Attend the scheduled Child Support Review Process Appointment.

Both parents will work with the specialist to create a new child support order that accurately reflects the changes in your financial situation. Depending on your changed income, the new child support order may increase or decrease your required child support payments.

A judge will sign the new child support order if both parents agree with the revised terms, officially ending the process of reporting a new job. Disagreements about the revised terms may result in a separate court hearing where a judge will examine the modification request and determine if the child support order should be changed.

Related: My Child’s Father Wants Custody to Avoid Child Support

FAQs About Reporting New Jobs to Child Support in Texas

Do I need to report my new job to child support?

Reporting a new job to child support is not required. Individuals interested in lowering the cost of their child support payments may want to report a new job to child support.

Is there any way to estimate changes in child support payments?

Use the Monthly Child Support Calculator for an estimate of how much child support you may be paying with your new job.

What if my new job is a part-time job?

Follow the same process even if your employment is part-time. The Child Support Review Specialist will consider your previous job and Texas’ federal minimum wage when drafting the new child support order.

Contact Us

If you or a loved one would like to learn more about how to report a new job to child support in Texas, get your free consultation with one of our child support attorneys today!