What You Need to Know About Georgia Employment Law

Each state has slightly different rules regarding employment. Here’s everything you need to know about Georgia employment law.

Georgia law protects you from workplace discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or genetic information. The minimum wage in Georgia is $5.15 per hour.

What are your rights as an employee?

Federal civil rights laws protect you from employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or genetic information. Georgia does not offer additional civil rights protections beyond the federal civil rights protections.

What is the minimum wage in Georgia?

The state minimum wage in Georgia is $5.15 per hour.

The federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour. Federal minimum wage applies to employers with at least six employees. The federal minimum wage applies whenever it exceeds the state minimum wage.

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What is Georgia’s overtime law?

Employees in Georgia covered by the federal overtime law are paid overtime if they work more than 40 hours per week. The overtime wage is 1.5 times your normal wage.

Employees in Georgia not covered by the federal overtime law are not eligible for overtime.

Is your employer covered by the federal overtime law?

Employers are covered by the federal overtime law if they have a gross volume of sales or business of $500,000 or more and:

  • Are engaged in interstate commerce
  • Assist in the production of goods in interstate commerce
  • Handle, sell, or work on goods that move in interstate commerce

Are you covered by the federal overtime law?

You may be covered by the federal overtime law even if your employer does not meet the above qualifications. If your job involves interstate commerce, you may be covered by the federal overtime law.
Employees are covered by the federal overtime law if they:

  • Regularly handle mail as part of their job
  • Regularly use the telephone as part of their job
  • Regularly use the internet as part of their job
  • Handle credit card transactions as part of their job
  • Ship goods to different states as part of their job
  • Work for a business that functions as a hospital
  • Work for an institution caring for sick, elderly, or mentally ill patients who live on the premises
  • Work for a school for disabled or gifted children
  • Work for a preschool, elementary, or secondary school
  • Work for an institution of higher education
  • Work for a public agency
  • Work as a housekeeper, chauffeur, cook, or full-time babysitter and make at least $1,700 per year or work over 8 hours per week

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What are Georgia’s right-to-work laws?

Right-to-work laws offer non-union members the same opportunities for employment as union members. In Georgia, you do not have to become a union member or remain a union member as a condition of your employment.

What is workplace harassment?

Workplace harassment is unwelcome conduct in the workplace that targets a person based on their race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or genetic information.

What is workplace retaliation?

Workplace retaliation is any unfavorable action a company takes against an employee because they filed a harassment complaint or participated in an investigation of a harassment complaint.

Workplace retaliation includes but is not limited to the following actions when taken by a company as a response to a harassment complaint:

  • Firing
  • Giving negative evaluations
  • Demoting
  • Disciplining
  • Reassigning
  • Reducing pay
  • Reducing hours
  • Denying benefits, overtime, or promotions
  • Blacklisting
  • Intimidating

What are Georgia’s whistleblower laws?

In Georgia, whistleblower laws protect public employees from workplace retaliation. Georgia’s whistleblower laws do not protect private employees.

What is at-will employment in Georgia?

Georgia is an at-will employment state. In at-will employment states, the employee works at the will of the employer. The employer is allowed to fire the employee at any time, without any advance notice, and for almost any reason. The employer may not fire an employee based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or genetic information.

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If you or a loved one would like to learn more about Georgia Employment Law FAQs, get your free consultation with one of our Employment Attorneys in Georgia today!